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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
an encreasing challenge to america's military. this is the environment that is facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat or declining budgets. the onset of these constraints has led to belt tightening in military modernization, force structure, personnel costs and overhead expenditures. it has given us the opportunity to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities. the process began under the leadership of secretary gates. secretary gates curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued secretary panetta who crafted new strategic guidance in an f.y. 2013 defense budget plan which reduced the department's top line by $487 billion over the course of a decade. the president's request of $526.6 billion for fy 2014 continues to implement the president's defense strategic guidance and enhances the department's efforts at institutional reform. most critically, it sustains the quality of the all-volunteer force and t
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... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] [cheers and applause] >> jon: welcome back. we're here with former president jimmy carter. it must be interesting for you. you were president 1976 to 1980. you know, during that time you had a very difficult time with crazy north korea leader that you had to try toll negotiate out developing nuclear weapons. >> yes. >> jon: there was an invasion of afghanistan that you had to take a stand on. does it ever strike you as -- so have we moved nowhere? are we just gerbils running on a wheel? [laughter] this is the third generation of kims that is -- then the forth the kardashian. [ laughter ] that are using sort of nuclear threat to gain some type of attention. >> well, when bill clinton was president, i went over to north korea because we were faced with a war between north korea and south creal. i noilgted with the seen -- south korea. i negotiated with the senior kim who was worshiped like jesus christ and george washington combined. they would do anything he said. we negotiated for a number of hours. he agreed with everything i
-- scare people, but what you should do in this environment is don't get distracted from there, don't go for fear. >> ross, if what you're saying suggests, perhaps, gold still is a safe haven, why do you think so? >> let me qualify that. it's an imperfect safe haven. it's an imperfect safe haven, particularly in the short run. >> against what? >> against financial meltdown or inflation or politicians not doing what they should do, in that case. so it's an insurance plan, if you like. >> is the reason we have this down move is because people are now -- is the gold pricing in the fact we're not going to get more qe out of -- >> it may be. and it's part of the story dwr the shorts have hit gold is not because of what has happened, but because of what hasn't happened. we haven't had hyper inflation. we didn't have the euro collapse. certain things didn't happen. i think that would have aggravated the gold market. fundamentally, it still remains in the short-term a long haven and imperfect. >> if nvs the kind of move, you know, that indicated that if gold were going to respond to more quantit
in a diversionary environment? >> obviously the world is very dynamic. we have the report from china that their growth was not as robust as expected. economic act two that he is not quite as robust to support this type of equity market. there are concerns that confidence is fading on the u.s. federal reserve monetary policy as well. >> i think that is part of it. i think what you observe in a marketplace is at the asian market is still very interested in gold. they are very active in this cold environment. earlier this year, the indians were a little bit challenged. this clearly opened up the window for them. lori: let's talk about some of these gold mining stocks. a lot of people were concerned about the gold mining companies. getting back to your discussion with me on production costs versus -- do you think they are on a more bullish trajectory? >> i think we are getting a realignment that is a positive for the industry. lori: would you put new money into shares? >> not a position for us. lori: i appreciate your take. thank you. melissa: will the deadly boston terror attack change
environment and fortunately we had this happen that the first responders were ready and the tents were there and we do have some of the best hospitals in the world and it could have been norse -- worse. neil: but what it does about shaking america is confidence i will say we had been immune but largely save since 9/11. of lot of close calls that we have dodged that while seeing madrid, london, but not here. does this get americans that it cast a pall over this country again? >> is certainly makes us more aware if you have to be diligent to your surroundings that is something is out of place reported you are wrong you are embarrassed but if you are right you save lives. we live in the greatest country of the world we are best when our back is against the wall i am most proud of our country right now. people working together in marathon runners running to the hospitals to give blood. that is the of country we live in so hopefully people will be more aware but hopefully they will get mad with this form of terrorism to get back with the drone strike that we will stand tall and continue on
east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came together. to comfort the falle
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
of the larger faith community. >> the political environment is a lot different than in 2007 the last time congress took up an effort to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. right now we have evangelical leaders who have signed on and said, look, there's a religious imperative to embrace the stranger and to reach out and help people who are in our community. on the republican side, you have what they call a coalition of bibles, badges and business. you have faith leaders. you also have law enforcement leaders, attorney general from the states. and other sheriffs. and business leaders who are saying, look, our system is broken. its time to fix the system. on the republican side they're getting pressure from some of these core constituents to come up with a solution. >> ifill: is it fair to say after seeing his kind of tour de force on the sunday talk shows yesterday that senator marco rubio, the florida republican, is the face of this? or are there other... is there other agitation going on especially over in the house? >> marco rubio is seen as essential to presenting this bill to conse
measures that he's undertaken. for example he's been a little bit good on the environment where i think the latin left has been traditionally quite weak. >> i think he's incomparable. i don't think there's another leader like him or has pen in a long time. his charisma was off the charts. that's not necessarily a bad thing. the left has to learn how to administer. in terms of the 20th century of latin american history maybe juan perone or a few leaders here and there but i think chavez was really one of a kind. >> i'd rather we not have either a fidel or a chavez in the future. i think we're beyond that. what's interesting, for example, about someone like lula who was charismatic and successful and everything he has tended to fade away. he apparently is not running for his third term. a couple years from now. >> he's also ill. his successor is not doing a bad job. little by little what we're getting over in latin america and it's a good thing is this charismatic leaders some of whom are more successful and more attractive than others. one can like. one can dislike. those are personal qu
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bonnie, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the harrison family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious co
a weapon that is miniaturized but also can survive and function in a very stressful environment. and the important thing here is that in terms of their test history, north korea has never successfully tested a ballistic missile warhead to a range greater than 1300 kilometers. okay, then the third challenge is what missiles they have and what can they do. at the low end of the scale, the north koreans have 5-600 swan missiles which are basically a variant of the scud first flown by the soviets pack in the 1950s. and those give north korea the ability to cover targets pretty much in most of south korea. then there's the no-dong missile which has a range of 1300 kilometers, that allows coverage of targets in japan as well as south korea. but when you move beyond that, you get into a series of missiles that really cannot be regarded as proven. the focus of the last couple of weeks has been on this missile, two were reportedly moved towards the coast of north korea. there was some speculation that today in honor of the birthday there might be a launch. in this missile's supposed to h
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)